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Dawn K. Gull

Providing Family Law Representation In Western
Pennsylvania.

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Dawn K. Gull

Common reasons for child custody modification

| Mar 27, 2020 | Child Custody |

Petitioning a Pennsylvania court for modification of a child custody order is possible. It is not uncommon for situations to change in ways that require different arrangement, especially when an initial custody order was made when children were very young.

There are certain criteria that must be met for a modification request to be granted. First and foremost, any changes made must be in the best interests of the child. It is unlikely that a court will grant a custody modification if a child is happy, healthy, and well-adjusted as an agreement stands. There must be evidence that a change in custody or parenting time would be beneficial rather than detrimental.

Reasons for custody modification are numerous, but there are a few that are seen more commonly than others. One such reason would be if the child were in danger. For example, if one spouse has a new partner who is abusive. Another reason would be if one parent were relocating for a job. In this case, custody may need to be modified for the children to stay where they are to coincide with schooling or other activities. An out-of-town visitation schedule could be arranged when it would work best for the child. If one parent refused to cooperate with a current visitation schedule, modification may be allowed.

If you believe there may be a valid reason for modification of your current custody agreement, it is always best to consult with an experienced attorney before filing a petition. He or she can expertly assess the situation and provide an educated opinion on whether or not the court would approve or deny such a request based on the best interests of the child.